Posts tagged Sensor
Arduino Optical Fingerprint Sensor (AS608)

Optical fingerprint sensors take low-resolution snapshots of the tip of a finger and create arrays of identifiers that are then used to uniquely identify a given fingerprint. The AS608 is capable of storing up to 128 individual fingerprints. This tutorial will introduce the AS608 Arduino-compatible fingerprint sensor and how to validate and reject fingerprints based on the enrolled fingerprint information that will be given to the sensor. The fingerprint algorithm is handled by the AS608 and Arduino, so this tutorial will focus on implementation and putting the pieces together to make a working fingerprint sensor with Arduino.

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Arduino Interrupts with PIR Motion Sensor

The basics of Arduino’s hardware interrupt is explored through the use of a passive infrared (PIR) sensor. The passive infrared sensors used here operate at voltages from 2.7V - 5V and use very little energy when operating in the non-tripped state. The PIR sensor is ultimately tripped by an infrared source, typically human body heat (or another animal with similar radiative emission). When the PIR sensor is tripped it sends a HIGH signal to its OUT pin, which will be read by the Arduino’s interrupt pin (pin 2 or 3 on the Uno board). This process seems trivial, but when done correctly can save massive amounts of energy when dealing with battery-powered systems, as in home automation.

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Arduino Thermistor Theory, Calibration, and Experiment

Thermistor, whose name is derived from a combination of thermal and resistor, is a temperature sensing device that registers changes in internal resistance as a function of temperature. Thermistors are often chosen over thermocouples because they are more accurate, have a shorter response time, and are generally cheaper. For most applications, thermistors are the smart and easy selection for temperature sensing below 300 degrees Celsius. In our case, we will be using a Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) thermistor, where the resistance decreases as the temperature increases. NTC thermistors are most common in commercial products that operate in the tens of degrees like thermostats, toasters, and even 3-D printers. An NTC 3950 100k thermistor will be used, which is designed for 100kOhm resistance at 25 degrees Celsius. This tutorial will introduce methods for relating resistance to temperature by fitting factory calibration data. The performance of the thermistor will also be evaluated using an Arduino board and a simple Newton’s law of cooling experiment.

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Arduino Tachometer - Using a Hall Effect Sensor (A3144) to Measure Rotations from a Fan

Arduino tachometer used to calculate the rotational motion of a part. Tachometers read out revolutions per minute (RPM), which tells the user how often a rotating part completes one full rotation. RPM readings are used in the automotive, aerospace, and manufacturing fields. Tachometers can indicate fuel consumption and motor speed, safety of moving parts, and even wind speed indicators. In this tutorial, the speed of a fan is measured using a hall sensor and neodymium magnet to acquire an accurate depiction of fan speed.

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Capacitive Touch Sensor with Arduino

Capacitive sensing from human touch. Create a switch without any moving parts with an Arduino board and an inexpensive capacitive touch sensor.

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Arduino I2C OLED Display - Temperature and Humidity Display (SSD1306)

How to print temperature and humidity readings onto a 0.96 inch I2C OLED display. The device is DIYMall's inexpensive, high resolution (128x64 pixels), yellow and blue organic LED display that is designed for use with the Arduino platform. Together with a DHT22 temperature sensor, the tiny OLED screen will display real-time humidity and temperature data using an Adafruit library and an Arduino Uno board. This project can be expanded upon to print data from a wide array of sensors, and even grab data from the internet to print values for a smart and interactive display.

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