Posts tagged Arduino IoT
Arduino GPS Tracker

The NEO-6 is a miniature GPS module designed by u-blox to receive updates from up to 22 satellite on 50 different channels that use trilateration to approximate fixed position of a receiver device every second (or less, for some modules). The particular module used in this tutorial, the NEO-6M, is capable of updating its position every second and communicates with an Arduino board using UART serial communication. The NEO-6M uses the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) protocol which provides temporal and geolocation information such as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), latitude, longitude, altitude, and approximate course speed. The NEO-6M and Arduino board will also be paired with an SD module to create a portable logger that acts as a retrievable GPS tracker.

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WeMos D1 Mini ESP8266 Arduino WiFi Board

The WeMos D1 Mini is an inexpensive ESP8266-based WiFi board that is low-profile but just as powerful as any NodeMCU or ESP8266-based microcontroller. The D1 Mini is incredibly versatile because it is inexpensive, WiFi-enabled, and fully compatible with the Arduino platform. In this tutorial, the ESP8266 library and board manager will be introduced in order to get the D1 Mini acting as an Arduino board. Then, a simple web page will be introduced with the intention of harnessing the WiFi capabilities of the module. The D1 Mini will act as a web server, allowing any WiFi-connected device to interact with the board and control its pins wirelessly.

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Arduino Interrupts with PIR Motion Sensor

The basics of Arduino’s hardware interrupt is explored through the use of a passive infrared (PIR) sensor. The passive infrared sensors used here operate at voltages from 2.7V - 5V and use very little energy when operating in the non-tripped state. The PIR sensor is ultimately tripped by an infrared source, typically human body heat (or another animal with similar radiative emission). When the PIR sensor is tripped it sends a HIGH signal to its OUT pin, which will be read by the Arduino’s interrupt pin (pin 2 or 3 on the Uno board). This process seems trivial, but when done correctly can save massive amounts of energy when dealing with battery-powered systems, as in home automation.

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Arduino SD Card Module Data Logger

This tutorial will explore the range of capabilities available to the Arduino SD library by using a real-world example of data logging. The SD library allows users to read/write, list files, create/remove files, and make/delete directories. Additionally, we will develop an algorithm that creates a new file every time the Arduino board is restarted, which will prevent overwriting of existing data records. The resulting data file will be in comma separated format and contain multiple data points, including a time stamp in milliseconds since the program started. Therefore, it is important to record the program start time. For very accurate time monitoring tasks, a real-time clock is recommended, however, for the experiments conducted here, relative time suffices.

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iPhone Datalogger with Arduino Using The iOS Bluetooth App BLExAR

The BLExAR app will be used in conjunction with a CC2541 (HM-10, JDY-08, AT-09, SH-M08) Bluetooth module and an Arduino (ATmega328) board to create a simple data acquisition system. A DHT22 sensor will provide temperature and humidity data to the Arduino which will be recorded by an iOS device via the BLExAR app. This experiment is a real-world example of an Arduino application demonstrating data acquisition from a real sensor. This tutorial will allow users to solve their own engineering problems using the modern Arduino platform and wireless communication through the BLExAr app, which will ultimately expand the reach and compatibility of technology in the classical sciences through exploration and experimentation.

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4-Pin RGB LED Control Using iOS BLExAR App, HM-10 Bluetooth Module, and Arduino

Control an RGB LED using three PWM pins on an Arduino Uno board via Bluetooth communication. An RGB LED is a single casing with three cathode (or anode) pins and one anode (or cathode) pin. This results in a 4-pin LED. In this tutorial, I will be using an RGB LED with three anodes and one common cathode. This means that we can change the color of the LED to over 16.7 million different variations (assuming each anode produces a different luminosity for each voltage change of the Arduino PWM pin). This tutorial will help demonstrate the power of the BLExAR app, and the flexibility of an Arduino board under iOS Bluetooth control. In my case, I will be using an iPhone with the BLExAR app, but an iPad would suffice as well.

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iOS and Arduino Bluetooth Communication Using The BLExAR App and CC2541 Module

An app called “BLExAR” allows Arduino users to communicate to an iOS device (iPhone or iPad) using a Bluetooth CC2541 module (different versions are called: HM-10, SH-M08, AT-09, or JDY-08). The app permits control of an Arduino board, wireless serial communication, and data acquisition. Click on the app logo shown here to download the app, as it will be used as the iOS communication software. On the Arduino side, we need to wire the CC2541 Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) module to an Arduino board and upload the appropriate software via the Arduino IDE. In this tutorial, we will demonstrate how to verify communication between an Arduino and CC2541 Bluetooth module, and then use Bluetooth communication to send strings between an iOS device and the Arduino ATmega328p board.

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Arduino - Sending A String Over Bluetooth Using The HM-10

As an introduction to Bluetooth with Arduino or Raspberry Pi, I recommend using a component called the HM-10 [datasheet here]. The HM-10 is a Bluetooth low energy module that employ Bluetooth 4.0, which is currently the most widely used protocol for wireless devices (along with Wifi, but I will discuss this later). All of the current iPhones, Androids, and Google phones use Bluetooth 4.0, and it will likely be around for quite a while. The module is powered at 3.3V and consumes around 50mA (peak), 8.5mA (nominal), and can sleep with a current between 400uA - 1.5mA. It claims to have an open-space transmission range of 100m, and boasts transfer rates at 2 kilobytes per second. The underlying chip is a Texas Instruments CC-2540/2541 [see here]. The HM-10 is particularly germane because it cooperates nicely with the Arduino software with a mere four lines of code in the IDE. 

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